Categories and Judging Sheets

All Kingdom of Caid sponsored competitions will use the same categories and feedback sheets.  Each of the seven categories contains subcategories related to that field.  As an entrant, it is a good idea to go through and review the scoring and feedback sheets so that you are aware of what the experts will be looking at.  Remember that each item is scored on its own against a period ideal.  If you need help finding the best category for your entry, please contact the Competition Steward or Kingdom A&S Competition Deputy.

Click on the category name to view the scoring and feedback sheet.

We are hard at work and will be adding the judging sheets shortly

Visual

1.1.0 Calligraphy

1.2.0 Illumination

1.3.0 Jewelry (Please select a subcategory)
1.3.1 Metalwork
1.3.2 Enamel or Cloisonné
1.3.3 Lapidary (stones/gems which have been cut or faceted by the entrant)
1.3.4 Beadwork/Pearls

1.4.0 Glasswork (Please select a subcategory)
1.4.1 Leaded or Stained
1.4.2 Blown Glass
1.4.3 Beads

1.5.0 Heraldic Display (Please select a subcategory)
1.5.1 Use of device or badge on garb
1.5.2 Banner or Flag
1.5.3 Painted Item
1.5.4 Armor Item (helm, crest, shield, etc.)
1.5.5 Other Item

1.6.0 Ceramics (Please select a subcategory)
1.6.1 Decorative
1.6.2 Functional

1.7.0 Surface Decoration (please select a subcategory)
1.7.1 Painted Item
1.7.2 Metalwork Item (including repoussé)
1.7.3 Engraving/chasing (including intaglio)
1.7.4 Woodcarving
1.7.5 Other Item

1.8.0 Drawing

1.9.0 Period Model (A replica in miniature of a structure(s) that existed or could have existed within our time period of study. Please note that the structure should be identified with respect to time and country of origin [e.g., a late 12th century English manor].)

1.10.0 Research or Process Project – Visual (This category is focused on the “Sciences” part of Arts & Sciences. Entry should explain the hands-on research done to answer an SCA-period-appropriate question pertaining to the Visual Arts. For example, an entry could show the multiple attempts to recreate 14th ceramic glaze methods and the results of the experiments. The entry should focus on the hands-on process and experimentation performed and the conclusion reached from the results.)

Functional

2.1.0 Furniture (including pavilions)

2.2.0 Musical Instruments

2.3.0 Scientific Instruments (telescope, astrolabe, etc.)

2.4.0 Metalwork (please select a subcategory)
2.4.1 Cast Metal
2.4.2 Forged Metal

2.5.0 Herb craft (Non-edible only. No toxic ingredients allowed. Recipe required with documentation.)
2.5.1 Comfort or Cosmetic (perfume, soaps, lotions, etc.)
2.5.2 Ornamental (potpourri, pomander, etc.)

2.6.0 Games or Toys (chess sets, game boards, etc.)

2.7.0 Tools (please select a subcategory)
2.7.1 Functional Arts Tools (tools used for leatherworking, metalworking, etc.)
2.7.2 Fiber Arts Tools (tools used for spinning, weaving, sewing, etc.)
2.7.3 Scribal Tools (quills, reeds, inks, paints, etc.)
2.7.4 Culinary Tools

2.8.0 Depth Project (Entry is an in-depth entry that covers multiple categories. For example, an entry could recreate a 16th century table setting that includes a woven table covering, ceramic plates, blown glass goblets, and forged eating utensils. All art forms will be judged equally and contribute to the final score.)

2.9.0 Research or Process Project – Functional (This category is focused on the “Sciences” part of Arts & Sciences. Entry should explain the hands-on research done to answer an SCA-period-appropriate question pertaining to the Functional Arts. For example, an entry could show the multiple attempts to recreate a Viking-era forge and the results of the experiments.  The entry should focus on the hands-on process and experimentation performed and the conclusion reached from the results.)

2.10.0 Other (Contact the Competition Steward for permission to use this subcategory.)

Armor and Weaponry

3.1.0 Armor (Please select a subcategory)
3.1.1 Complete Suit
3.1.2 Individual Item (gorget, gauntlet, breastplate, legs, chainmail, etc.)
3.1.3 Helms
3.1.4 Shields

3.2.0 Equestrian

3.3.0 Weapons (Please select a subcategory)
3.3.1 Daggers and Swords
3.3.2 Archery Equipment
3.3.3 Other

3.4.0 Fighter Garb (gambeson, pourpoints, cyclas, etc.)

3.5.0 Research or Process Project – Armor/Weapons (This category is focused on the “Sciences” part of Arts & Sciences. Entry should explain the hands-on research done to answer an SCA-period-appropriate question pertaining to the Armor and Weaponry Arts. For example, an entry could show the multiple attempts to determine the best arrow shape for hunting rabbits in period and the results of the experiments. The entry should focus on the hands-on process and experimentation performed and the conclusion reached from the results.)

Fiber and Clothing

4.1.0 Clothing (please select a subcategory)
4.1.1 Clothing Review (garment on a live model, emphasis on “total picture”)
4.1.2 Clothing Construction (garment judged on construction techniques)
4.1.3 Accessories (belts, purses, fans, gloves, etc.)
4.1.4 Hats
4.1.5 Shoes

4.2.0 Weaving (please select a subcategory)
4.2.1 Wide Woven (tapestries, fabric, etc.)
4.2.2 Narrow Woven (trim, belts, etc.)
4.2.3 Knitting or Nalbinding
4.2.4 Other item

4.3.0 Spinning

4.4.0 Needlework

4.5.0 Lace Making (bobbin or needle lace, drawn or cut linen work, etc.)

4.6.0 Dyeing (Entry should consist of a quantity of natural fiber as loose unspun fiber, spun yarn, woven fabric, or felted fabric.)

4.7.0 Research or Process Project – Fiber (This category is focused on the “Sciences” part of Arts & Sciences. Entry should explain the hands-on research done to answer an SCA-period-appropriate question pertaining to the Fiber Arts. For example, an entry could show the experimentation done to determine how water pH effects woad dye and the results of the experiments.  The entry should focus on the hands-on process and experimentation performed and the conclusion reached from the results.)

Culinary

Documentation for all culinary entries must include both the period AND redacted version of the recipe, including an ingredient list. The period recipe can be either an extant written recipe or non-recipe source such as a depiction of the dish in art of literature of the time.

Entries must be prepared ahead of time. No cooking or brewing is done on site or during the competition.

All foods for consumption must be kept at safe food temperatures. Entrants may provide two versions of their dish – a presentation version and a sampling version. The latter may be kept in a cooler or heated container – bring what you will need (e.g., an ice chest or crock pot). Electricity is available for crock pots. Note on your registration form if you need access to an outlet.

All sampling dishes, storage containers, and utensils for the judges (including cutting, serving, and eating implements) must be provided by the entrant. Disposable serving items may be used for the sampling version.

If you are entering a condiment, include a food on which to eat your condiment.

No toxic ingredients (no matter how period) may be used. Seriously, don’t poison the judges. If a recipe calls for something toxic, substitute that ingredient and explain in your documentation why you did so. Judges are not required to taste anything they suspect is dangerous to consume. If you think there’s a chance someone might think you entry looks spoiled, but it really isn’t (e.g., a cheese freshly curdled with citrus), note that in your documentation.

A minimum of two (2) pints must be provided for each Brewing entry.

5.1.0 Breads (yeast breads or flat breads)

5.2.0 Sweets (cakes, cookies, candies, desserts)

5.3.0 Preserves (all preserved and fermented fruits or vegetables)

5.4.0 Meat Dish (please select a subcategory)
5.4.1 Fresh Meat Dish (including fresh sausage)
5.4.2 Preserved and Cured Meats (bacon, smoked meats, brined meats, dried meats)

5.5.0 Vegetarian Dish (any non-meat dish)

5.6.0 Cheese

5.7.0 Subtleties and Illusion Foods

5.8.0 Condiments (mustards, sauces)

5.9.0 Brewing (please select a subcategory)
5.9.1 Beer
5.9.2 Wine
5.9.3 Varietals (sodas, fortifieds, liqueurs, vinegars, fermented fruits, and kumis)
Judging Forms for Brewing can be found here.

5.10.0 Research or Process Project – Culinary (This category is focused on the “Sciences” part of Arts & Sciences. Entry should explain the hands-on research done to answer an SCA-period-appropriate question pertaining to the Culinary Arts. For example, an entry could show the multiple attempts to recreate 14th century food preservation methods and the results of the experiments. The entry should focus on the hands-on process and experimentation performed and the conclusion reached from the results.)

Peformance

Three copies of the performance piece and documentation should be provided for the judges. If the performance piece is in a language other than English, entrant should provide a translation and/or brief synopsis.

6.1.0 Dramatic Interpretation (Memorized performance of a written piece or an original composition with a subject and style common to pre-1650 culture. Ten minutes maximum.)

6.2.0 Dramatic Reading (Reading of a piece or an original composition with a subject and style common to pre-1650 culture. Ten minutes maximum.)

6.3.0 Storytelling (Performance of a story or an original story written with a pre-1650 subject and style. Documentation consists of the story with historical facts and commentary about the story. Ten minutes maximum.)

6.4.0 Vocal Performance (Performance of a vocal selection or a new composition in pre-1650 style. Ten minutes maximum.)

6.5.0 Instrumental Performance (Performance of an instrumental selection or a new composition in pre-1650 style. Ten minutes maximum.)

6.6.0 Dance (please select a subcategory)
6.6.1 Performance of Historical Choreography
6.6.2 Performance of Original Choreography

6.7.0 Persona Presentation (Entrants will be given a 15-minute time slot in which the judges will interact with them and talk to them in persona. This is not a Q&A! Think of this as Historical Improvisation. Entrants are expected to interact with the judges while staying in the persona’s character. Entrants will be judged on overall effectiveness, ability to stay in persona, knowledge of their period, and other criteria. Props are encouraged but not required. Documentation should not be a first person re-telling of the persona story; instead it should set the stage for the time period and persona, with an emphasis on the activities of daily life. Documentation is due to the Entries Steward by the registration deadline. Bring a display copy with you the day of the event.)

Composition

7.1.0 Poetry (Original composition in the style of and using content appropriate for the poetry of an identified pre-1650 culture. Must be accompanied by documentation.)

7.2.0 Musical Composition (please select a subcategory)
7.2.1 Instrumental Composition  (Composition for instrumental performance. A written score is required. The score may be handwritten as long as it is neat and easy to follow. Entrants have the option of including a recording as well. Must be accompanied by documentation.
7.2.2 Vocal Composition (Composition for vocal performance. A written score with lyrics is required. The score may be handwritten as long as it is neat and easy to follow. Entrants have the option of including a recording as well. If lyrics are in a language other than English, entrant must provide a translation. Must be accompanied by documentation.)

7.3.0 Play (Original composition in the style of and using content appropriate for a play of an identified pre-1650 culture. Maximum 4,100 words. Must be accompanied by documentation.)

7.4.0 Prose (please select a subcategory)
7.4.1 Informational Expository
This is an article or paper on a subject of historical interest and should convey information in an engaging style (e.g., an article appropriate for Tournaments Illuminated). The judging will focus on the writer’s voice and how well the information from different sources is integrated in an entertaining fashion. The judges will look for the fresh historical insight instead of a list of facts gathered from multiple sources. The layout and incorporation of illustrations/graphics are also important. Research obtained from external sources should be attributed within the text of the piece, rather than footnotes. Mechanics of spelling, punctuation, grammar and the appearance of the paper will be judged. Maximum length of the entry is 4,100 words. The entry must include an alphabetical list of references at the end of the piece that contains any attributed sources. For judging purposes, the list of references must provide the specific page number ranges for the attributions in the piece to allow the judges to identify the source material. This reference or “works cited” list does not count toward the word count limit.

7.4.2 Original Composition in the Style of a pre-1650 Work
This composition may be fiction or nonfiction and must be documented. The composition itself will be judged on how well and creatively the information is portrayed, how well the entrant portrays the style and content of an author from the period. The documentation should explain the historical style and how the entry fits this style. The documentation will be judged on how well the entrant proved the entry is correct for the style attempted. The documentation must include an alphabetical bibliography, or “works cited” list with specific page references. The overall appearance of the paper will also be considered, as will the mechanics of spelling, punctuation and grammar. Mechanics will also include appropriate use of pre-1650 style variations, which should be explained in the documentation. Maximum length for the composition is 4,100 words, excluding endnotes, documentation and bibliography.

7.5.0 How to Paper
The paper must cover the design and making of an item applicable to a pre-1650 culture. The introduction should explain item and its historical authenticity. An explanation of the research should follow. This explanation should specify both how the author adapted period processes and any processes the author discovered by experimentation. The bulk of the paper should then provide step-by-step instructions  that could be used to duplicate the project. The paper should end with a brief conclusion stating the outcome of the process and provide some historical relevance and context. Judging will be weighted in two areas: a) how well the author combined historical source material with their own processes, and b) how clearly the instructions enable a reader to replicate the making of the item. The readability of diagrams and pictures, and how well their formatting enhances the flow of the information, will also be considered. Mechanics of spelling, punctuation, and grammar and the overall appearance of the paper will be considered. The documentation must include an alphabetical bibliography, or “works cited” list with specific page references. Maximum length is 4,100 words, excluding footnotes, endnotes, and bibliography.

7.6.0 Research Compositions (please select a subcategory)
A research composition proposes a focused topic (7.6.1 Topic Paper) or an actual research question (7.6.2 Research Paper) then provides evidence from a variety of sources to support and explain the topic or to answer the research question. A research composition is the final product of research, critical thinking, source evaluation, organization, and integration of the material from multiple sources to provide a fresh view of a topic or to answer a research question. Broad or generic topics will not score as well as a focused topic or question. The paper should begin with an introduction that presents the topic or question and provides historical relevance or context. The paper should end with a conclusion that summarizes the findings and the importance and relevance of the topic/question beyond a simple restatement of the introduction.

7.6.1 Topic Paper – A topic paper should contain all of the elements described for research compositions above. The paper has a specific pre-1650 historical topic or a specific topic of interest to the SCA mind. A topic paper doesn’t require an actual research question but the integration and synthesis of information is important. The topic paper should provide more than a list of facts, statements or data from multiple sources. The author’s ability to synthesize and integrate the material to provide an intriguing or fresh viewpoint will be a primary concern in judging the paper. Judging will also consider the breadth and scholarly nature of the sources and how well each source is used. Maximum length is 4,100 words, excluding footnotes or endnotes, and bibliography.

7.6.2 Research Paper – A research paper should contain all of the elements described for research compositions above. The research paper asks a thesis question which will be answered. The thesis question asks about something from pre-1650 culture or about modern perceptions of something from that time. The introduction should present the question and provide historical relevance and context for the question – with scholarly resources supporting that context. The body of the paper provides evidence from a variety of scholarly sources that the author presents and analyzes (e.g., comparing and contrasting evidence from multiple sources, providing summary tables of information from different sources, etc.) to answer the research question, and to explain more fully the historical relevance of the question and its answer. The conclusion summarizes the answer to the research question based on the evidence, explains the importance of the question, and provides some context beyond a simple restatement of the introduction. Judging will focus on the research question and analysis of data, how convincingly the evidence answered the question, and how well the author explained the historical relevance or context. Almost as much emphasis will be placed on the research sources and their use – how scholarly the sources are, the breadth of sources used, and how thoroughly the sources were used. Writing style, mechanics, and appearance of the paper – as described for all research compositions – will receive somewhat less emphasis than for a topic paper, but will still significantly affect the score. Maximum length is 4,100 words, excluding endnotes and bibliography.

Revised September, 2018